Posts Tagged 'career change'

Baby Boomers May Expect “Unexpected” Career Changes

FriedaBaby boomers were born roughly between 1946 and 1964, depending on which resource you agree with. Technically this means that we are all currently between the ages of 56 to 76 years old. To date, there are approximately 76 million baby boomers in the U.S. alone. I too am a member of this club. We were initially raised with fewer career opportunities as compared to today’s variety. We were taught to get a good job with a good medical plan, with dental and vision benefits included. The anticipated retirement plan was also a firmly engraved expectation. Continue reading ‘Baby Boomers May Expect “Unexpected” Career Changes’

Finding new Employment Professionally

Recently, a few close colleagues, supervisors, and managers have accepted positions elsewhere or promoted to higher positions within the organization. While some were only in their positions for as little as a year, others had been at the same company for much longer. This captured my attention, and I began to ponder when it’s okay to safely move onto a new position. I state “safely” because there are two sides to this debate we should keep in mind. First, short periods of employment may raise eyebrows to future employers and secondly, obtaining additional skills aside from your current career roadmap is imperative to career development and future career progression. We will discuss these two views in more detail later. I would like to discuss statistics, personal insights, and my recommendation of when it is the best opportunity to seek new employment. Continue reading ‘Finding new Employment Professionally’

Dead Man Walking

will-s-0209Exploring high skill/high growth occupations.

As the economy continues to sputter along more people are beginning to ponder their career options. Over two million jobs were put to rest during the past 24 months and some fields have been hit harder than others. If your current industry has been hit hard, it may be time to take a closer look at other occupational alternatives. Continue reading ‘Dead Man Walking’


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