I Could So Be An Elf!

Finding seasonal employment at the winter holidays
I really try to avoid the malls the day after Thanksgiving – known as Black Friday – leaving them to the aggressive deal hunters out there. This year, however, I was suckered into going by my wife. She bribed me with continual infusions of Starbucks coffee, promising me even more delights were just around the next corner of the mall. As I wandered in search of more caffeine, I looked to see who was hiring

The typical retail jobs were there; and believe it or not, even in mid-December it’s not too late to get one. Despite the economy, the retail sector still thrives every holiday season. We might have to be smarter about what we buy, but we still buy—right?

First, these are some of the most flexible jobs, as well as the jobs requiring the most flexibility from an employee. Most seasonal employment is listed as part-time but in fact, full-time hours are available to the employees wanting to work needed shifts. These jobs are perfect for college students, teachers, and others that might have a hiatus during the winter holidays. Most retail employers want people that will be able to work a flexible shift until mid- to late-January. They need lots of employees because we all have to return that blinking Rudolph sweater we get from grandma every year (or is that just me?). My advice is to be honest with yourself and the employers about your availability.

I spoke with a couple of employers while browsing the malls and they seemed glad to talk to me to avoid the soccer moms and their rants about the lack of Winter Princess Barbie in the blue dress (not the red dress or the green dress, mind you, the blue dress). They still need people for interesting jobs. The overnight stocker and floor design associate jobs intrigued me. Imagine working overnight to restock new goods for the next day’s rush without crowds taking the merchandise right out of your hands! The floor design people were like stockers that made things pretty. Dressing mannequins, setting up displays, tearing down displays, setting out promotions…all sounded fun!

But retail is retail, and if you have a holiday spirit like me (I own at least seven holiday ties, five boxes of Christmas décor, and break out the seasonal music CDs right after Halloween), then you might like the idea of something a bit more creative.

There are special souls in this world that enjoy the frenetic nature of the malls, the rush of the crowds, the cinnamon and pine-scented air, the blinking displays, and the screaming children steadfastly dragged along by their mentally-elsewhere father’s pant legs (if UT is playing anyone, Dad is physically at Macy’s but in the BCS otherwise). If you’re one of these people, why not consider a position as one of Santa’s helpers? Did you know that greeters, photographers, child wranglers, and parent appeasers make $8.00 – $10.00 an hour to spread holiday cheer? This position lasts until mid-January because once New Year’s Day hits, Santa has to be back at the North Pole in preparation for next year’s Wii requests (please add me to the list, Santa!). For 3-5 weeks of part-time work, that’s an extra $300-500 of fun money for your efforts. Not bad.

Our Houston efforts to bring the North down South with snow villages, ice rinks, and winter festivals offer opportunities for seasonal employment. The Ice Rink at Discovery Green needed over 40 employees to work the ice and concessions. What a great way to enjoy some winter cheer outdoors while making extra money. Now, if they need someone to demonstrate how to make one of those awkward I-don’t-know-how-to-ice-skate splits and fall on his patookus, I’m in.

Be honest about the time you have to spend on seasonal employment and your dedication to the job. These are opportunities requiring lots of energy! So, if you live to share the joy of the season and are flexible with your time, check out one of these jobs at Workforce Solutions. Once you get the job, comment below. We’d love to hear about your seasonal work experience!

Danny Zendejas is the Educaiton Liason for Workforce Solutions in the Houston metropolitan area. He has over ten years of experience in working in the public sector and over five years experience in workforce development

%d bloggers like this: