Get Social with Your Networking

Workforce SolutionsAll of us learn to look for every possible advantage when going after a good job. Online social networking can definitely be such an advantage, depending on what site you use and how. Online social networking is not all that different from face-to-face networking. The key is figuring out who knows who and how well you can directly reach the people who can help you.

I’d say a great start is to see yourself in the employer’s place — scouting for a few outstanding, easy-to-read facts about good people. If you were an employer and needed someone like you, how would you find you? Well, first remember that wherever you post and whatever you say, employers are most likely sorting through hundreds of profiles and don’t have time to read through a lot of “fluff.” Therefore, when posting professional information online, always keep it short, clear, and right to the point.

For example, Twitter limits you to 140 characters per “tweet.” So, if your purpose for having a Twitter account is to find employment, only “tweet” things that may draw potential employers to your profile and make them actually care about what you are tweeting. Otherwise, they will breeze right past what was written on their way to tweets they can use in looking for good job candidates. In fact, employers will “unfollow” someone if the tweets always seem concerned with unprofessional matters.

By the way, employers are like you and me — they take a second look at people who have things in common with them. So, don’t forget the good ole’ alma mater. On all job-search and networking sites, there’s obviously a chance of connecting with an employer when you offer information about the school(s) you attended and the year of graduation.

Meanwhile, steer clear of anything that has the potential of turning off an employer — just like on a resume. And, have you learned to always proof your own writing? I speak from experience in saying that writing tight prevents you from seeming long-winded while still letting you make your point. Always double-check punctuation, grammar, and organization before you hit send or submit.

Social networking may be your meal ticked to that next job. At the least, it may be part of that sm All of us learn to look for every possible advantage when going after a good job. Online social networking can definitely be such an advantage, depending on what site you use and how. Online social networking is not all that different from face-to-face networking. The key is figuring out who knows who and how well you can directly reach the people who can help you.

I’d say a good start is to see yourself in the employer’s place — scouting for a few good, easy-to-read facts about good people. If you were an employer and needed someone like you, how would you find you? Well, first remember that wherever you post and whatever you say about yourself, employers are likely sorting through hundreds of profiles and don’t have time to read through a lot of “fluff.” When you post professional information about yourself online, always keep it short, clear and right to the point.

For example, Twitter limits you to 140 characters per “tweet.” So, if your purpose for having a Twitter account is to find employment, only “tweet” things that may draw potential employers to your profile and make them actually care about what you are tweeting. Otherwise, they will breeze right past what you’ve written on their way to tweets they can use in looking for good job candidates. In fact, employers will “unfollow” you if your tweets always seem concerned with unprofessional matters.

By the way, employers are like you and me — they take a second look at people who have things in common with them. So, don’t forget your alma mater. On all job-search and networking sites, there’s obviously a chance of connecting with an employer when you offer information about the school(s) you attended and the year in which you graduated.

Meanwhile, steer clear of anything that has the potential of turning off an employer — just like you would on a resume. And, have you learned to always proof your own writing? I speak from experience in saying that writing tight prevents you from seeming long-winded while still letting you make your point. Always double-check punctuation, grammar, and organization before you hit send or submit!

Bobi Cook is a Regional Facilitator for Workforce Solutions in the Houston – Galveston area. Bobi has an MBA and over ten cumulative years experience as quality assurance developer within the automotive industry, a small business administrator, and professional educator. She currently utilizes these skills to help job seekers develop and implement successful job search campaigns conducting seminars throughout the 13 county region.



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