Feeling “Blah” and Job Searching

Claudia Many of us have those “blah” days, where the world seems a little bit harder to deal with, however, many have those blah days every day, and are currently unemployed. There are plenty of statistics out there that say that unemployment, depression, and anxiety go hand in hand. After seeing and reading those statistics and hearing individual stories, I understand how unemployment, the economy, and job search can take a toll on a person’s psyche.

If you are feeling “blah” or unfocused consider the following tips from well-known career consultants:

You’ve heard it before and hear it again: Job hunting is easily a full-time job. However, be sure to take some time for yourself. If you don’t take “down-time,” the stress will wear away at your mental health, leaving you in no shape for interviews and unmotivated to continue the search.

No “stewing” over your termination from your last job. Period. Forgive yourself for any mistakes; then concentrate on not repeating them again. Holding on to any anger, bitterness, or resentment will do you more harm than those who caused it.

If you’re really stuck in a rut, take some time to do needed chores around the house. Think of this as a break from your job search and see the benefit in the time that you’ve been given. It is always encouraging to complete a task and most of us have some we have been moving to the bottom of the list for a long time.

Make up a new plan of attack. Plans can be invigorating, and with the time that you’ve had to reflect, you may come upon new plans of attack. Now may be a great time to head your career in a new direction. With your last job, you gained experience that you didn’t have previously this may figure into you new plan.

Thoroughly search the market and see what’s out there. Look for areas of growth and opportunity, concentrate on your skills and abilities in a new/ fresh perspective. Consider getting more training if it’s likely to pay off.

When the stress is overwhelming, take a mental health day or go for a walk. Rediscover the world as it is, when you aren’t wearing “stress blinders.”

Join clubs, especially those associated with work interests. Consider  attending  university lectures. This might very well provide you with the contact that gets you that next job.

If those “blah days” occur more frequently, consider additional help, depression can be a serious condition that affects a person’s mind and body. Some more serious symptoms of depression include:

• Thought of death or suicide, or suicide attempts
• Decreased energy, fatigue, being “slowed down”
• Loss of interest or pleasure in activities that were once enjoyed
• Insomnia, over sleeping, or waking much earlier than usual
• Feelings of helplessness, guilt, and worthlessness
• Difficulty concentrating, making decisions, or remembering
• Restlessness, irritability, or excessive crying

The good news is that very effective treatments are available to help those who are depressed. Mental Health America is a good place to start to seek additional help.

Your mental health is important; you can very easily project poor mental health to a prospective employer during your interview or in a job fair environment. Remember that there is no magic potion to finding a job, but when we give into those “blah days” we start a downhill spiral that is counterproductive, so be proactive.

Claudia Magallan is the Disability Navigator for Workforce Solutions Workforce Solutions- Gulf Coast ensuring that customers with disabilities utilize all the services offered by Workforce Solutions. She has over 5 years of experience building relationships in the Houston Community and working with job seekers with barriers to employment.



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