Say What?

aleesa-0509Strange Work Requests

Fortunately, I work with fabulous co-workers who don’t create waves in the office with inappropriate requests. However, I recently heard a request in my recruiting network that nearly knocked my socks off…which in turn prompted me to write this blog. (I’m going to spare you the details for the sake of reputations, but I assure you it’s one for the record books!) Here are some interesting co-worker and job seeker requests that make you go…really? Be aware that these are not fabricated requests, and they come from bona fide office suggestion boxes from actual people.

True but shocking co-worker requests:
• Allow people to change clothes in their cubicles.
• Add tanning beds and a masseuse to the break room.
• Put beer in the vending machine.
• Cover jail time under family medical leave.
• Be required to work only during daylight hours because employee is scared of the dark.
• Replace a desk with a couch so employee could lie down and work.
• Install a swimming pool, hot tub and sauna at work.

And my personal favorite…a request to have team meetings in Hawaii.

Real and astonishing job seeker requests:
• Have a limo driver deliver them to a job interview.
• Provide money for a lunch interview.
• To have someone adopt their child.
• Attend candle-lit dinner dates, with red-heads only please.
• Purchase a personal computer and printer purchased asap for a gift.
• Post Bono’s face on the entrance of all doors.
• Contract a personal shopper for interview attire.

Last, but not least…request for someone else to apply for a job on their behalf due to a bad hair day.

In the human resources and recruiting network, there is a common buzz of outlandish requests but these are just a few that take the cake. A few hiring managers and recruiters have shared some of their most memorable moments for this blog…I assure you no co-workers or job seekers where harmed in the process. We all suppose the “requestors” figure if they never ask…they’ll never know!

There are ways to submit requests in an appropriate manner that don’t seem outlandish. Keep in mind the requests should be gender friendly, non offensive, and can be shared company wide. Before requesting, ask yourself this question: how will this affect others and is it reasonable and realistic for the work place? If the answer is yes then it is generally a safe work request. I recommend submitting the request to a suggestion box (if applicable) or discretely to a human resources department or management authority.

Do you know of any strange co-worker or job seeker requests? Comment on this blog to share. (Work appropriate only, please)

Aleesa Janssen is the Hospitality Staffing Specialist for Workforce Solutions in the Houston/Galveston region. She is a trained chef and has over eleven years of experience in the hospitality industry.



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