Don’t Let the Gloom Doom You

will-s-0209

The shattering results of the current recession have eliminated more than eight-million jobs over a two year period. Many economic pundits have said that the worst is probably over, but more people are still losing their jobs at a faster rate than any other time in history. Obviously, some industries have faired better than others during the economic decay, but danger still lurks in all areas.

As a Business Consultant, I’m always surprised how unprepared most people are when they are laid off. Some even witnessed layoffs in their own offices, but felt as though they might somehow be spared. Others are experiencing layoffs for the first time and simply don’t know how to react. Here are some steps to help you deal with the uncertainty:

Ask you supervisor to be upfront. Your manager has an obligation to the company to keep quiet on company matters, but depending on your relationship with your boss, you might be able to catch wind that something is coming down.

Go to HR and ask about your vacation and time off. Your HR department might not be able to tell you about pending layoffs, but they can confirm how much vacation and time off you have coming if there are layoffs.

Have some savings on hand. The experts say that we should keep at least six months salary in disposable savings in the event we are suddenly unemployed. Realistically, very few people have this kind of dough just sitting around. But, you should have some funds put away to cover your major bills for the short term even if it’s just for a few weeks. It might be a good idea to call and find out how much Unemployment Benefits you might be eligible for if you are laid off.

Always have your resume and skills updated. Refresh your resume and it keep handy on a disc or thumb file. You never know when you might need it. It might not be a bad idea to take a college course or certification to enhance your credentials while you’re still working.

Network while you’re still working. Don’t ever fail to neglect your current duties, but it might be a smart idea to reach out to other counterparts in your industry. Although they might be the competition, almost everyone these days is willing to share networking ideas in case something goes wrong.

Let’s face it, long term job security is a thing of the past. While we can’t control the elements surrounding job cuts, we can take a more proactive approach in preparing ourselves to deal with them as they occur.

Good luck with your endeavors and always remember to keep your head in the game.

Wil Smith is a Business Consultant for Workforce Solutions in the Houston metropolitan area. Wil has collected over 20 years of expertise in the areas of Corporate Training & Development, Recruitment and Operational Management; with the majority of that time working with a Fortune 500 Corporation. He has also worked in the Sports/ News industry as a Reporter and Broadcaster.


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